• DEMOGRAPHICS
    YEAR SCHOOL OPENED
    1931
    ATTENDANCE RATE (%)
    95.5%
    student Enrollment
    2038
    Race/Ethnicity (%)
    African American....................... 29.20
    Hawaii/Pac. Islander..........................
    White.............................. 41.85
    Multiracial...................... 5.99
    Hispanic......................... 18.16
    American Indian/AK....................... .49
    Asian.............................. 4.12
    GENDER (%)
    Male................................ 50.25 
    Female........................... 49.75
    Special Services** (%)
    FARMS........................... 40.46
    504.................................. 6.98
    Special Ed..................... 10.03
    LEP................................. no
    Title 1............................. 6.59%

     **Special Services Terms Glossary

    School Renovation Details - 1931, 1947, 1955, 1965, 1976; Buildings were added in the following order: D, F/B, C, E, A. This created the campus-style school.

Glen Burnie High School

Key Challenges to Student Success

  • The students who attend Glen Burnie High School are influenced daily by events, situations, and circumstances that occur at home and in their neighborhood.  While there are numerous factors that contribute to student achievement at Glen Burnie High, the school leadership team has narrowed its focus to the following challenges to student success, with the acknowledgement that this is not an all-inclusive list and that some students may be affected by other opportunities or issues in their young lives.

    This school's key challenges to student success are also noted in the boxes shown below.

  • Traditional MSDE and/or school-based student challenges

    • Attendance Rates
    • Discipline Rates
    • Number of FARMS Students
    • Number of English Learners (ELs)
    • 9th Grade Pass or Promotion Rates
    • PARCC Scores - Algebra I (Grade 9)

    Key Challenge #1: Attendance Rates

    At GBHS, overall enrollment has remained consistent for the last 5 years. Our Hispanic student group has increased from 12% in 2014 to 18.5 in 2018, whereas other student groups are relatively unchanged. The chronic absentee rate has risen from 30.9% in 2016 to 36.6% in 2018, as has the Absent 20 or more days category, from 23.9% in 2014 to 29.2% in 2018. The number of students with disabilities (SWD) has decreased from 23% in 2006 to 9.33% in 2018 and remained steady for the last five years.

    We must improve the number of students coming to school every day. Every child is original. Glen Burnie High School wants every student to feel like a valued member of the community. We want students to follow a path that will lead them to graduate in four years and in order for them to be successful in doing so we need them to attend school regularly. (Indicators 7 & 9)

    Key Challenge #2: Number of FARMS students

    The number of FARMS students has increased over the years to 41.38%, which is 10% higher than the district average.  As with many schools, the number of students and families who report a need for free and reduced meals is lower than the actual number who qualify.  Due to the size of our school and the needs of the community based on our FARMS population, all of our students receive free breakfast every day. 

    Many of our students both work and go to school in order to support their families or stay home with younger siblings so that their parents may work multiple jobs which in turn, can deeply impact their ability to participate in many school events or extracurriculars. Additionally, these needs can directly impact their school attendance. The pressures on students to earn income at a young age can create a conflict between their need to work and contribute to the family and their need to attend school.  Therefore, we witness evidence of this struggle in many of our academic and student success indicators. One of the most significant gaps at Glen Burnie High School is between our FARMS students and all students. (Indicators 7 & 9)

  • Non-Traditional Socio-Economic Challenges

    Key Challenge #3: Families in Crisis (mental, physical emotional, financial)

    The Glen Burnie community has its challenges. Some families struggle to create a balance between school and family responsibilities. Many of our students come to us each day with experiences that many of the adults that care for them have never experienced.  This is also evidenced through our attendance and student performance rates. Students deal with family loss, housing concerns, or even drug and opioid addiction of family members. They are witnesses to domestic violence, and many come from single parent households. These challenges and experiences of trauma may indirectly prompt students to act-out, creating disciplinary concerns which may result in additional missed class time.  Students who miss time in class also miss out on both instruction and opportunities that prepare them for success on standardized English and Mathematics assessments. (Indicators 7 & 9)

  • HISTORICAL SCHOOL & COMMUNITY CHALLENGES THAT HAVE INFLUENCED THE WRITING OF THIS SCHOOL'S STORY

    • Socio-Economic Community Issues (employment, income levels, housing costs)
    • Significant Changes Over Time in Student/Community Demographics
    • Access (or lack of access) to Community Financial Programs
    • Access (or lack of access) to Community Social Programs
    • Access (or lack of access) to Community Academic Support Programs

  • Glen Burnie High

     

  • SPECIAL PROGRAMS AT THIS SCHOOL

    AVID
    BMAH

    PSS Logo
    Project Lead the Way